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TONES v1.02 Pantone Color News & Views

Welcome to the inaugural issue of Tones, the quarterly newsletter from Pantone dedicated to color in its every expression: art and design, fashion and furnishings, culture and nature. Please feel free to send feedback or ideas to tones@pantone.com. We would love to hear what you think and what you might like to read about in future issues of Tones. Laurie Pressman, Managing Editor and Tim Young, Associate Editor

METALLIC GLIMMER

METALLIC GLIMMER

Seen all over the runway and at key home furnishings trade shows this past season, metallics speak to our desire to have some luxury and glamour in our lives. The wide variety of gold metallic shades we have seen in the past is still out there; however, as we move forward to 2011 we are seeing consumers turning away from excessive glitz and "bling" and instead moving toward metallic finishes and treatments that appear warmer. Artful patterning, mottled finishes and distressed or etching techniques are some of the new surface treatments being applied to the standard gold, silver and bronze metallic shades, as well as to color. The ongoing interest in combining different metallic shades is a trend we also see continuing for 2011.

Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director Pantone Color Institute
eisemancolorblog.com

Have you spotted unusual metallic colors or finishes lately? Send in your photos and we'll publish the most interesting submissions. Address entries to Tones@pantone.com with the word Metallics in the subject line.

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PANTONE fashion color report  spring 2011 – An Exotic Journey

Citing exotic destinations like Africa, India, Peru and Turkey as inspiration for spring 2011, designers continue to satisfy consumers' need to escape everyday challenges with intriguing color combinations that transport them to foreign lands.

"The colors designers have chosen for the spring season present an interesting marriage of unexpected warm and cool tones," said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute®. "By cleverly combining complementary colors, those that are opposite